Can we talk?

Conversations can change the world. Heather McGhee, New York Times-bestselling author of The Sum of Us, joins leaders from People’s Action and the New Conversation Initiative to talk about how deep canvass conversations can move hearts, minds and votes around divisive issues to create the change we need right now.

    The reason deep canvassing is so effective is because we’re taking the time
               to have meaningful human connection
.  

WHAT IS DEEP CANVASSiNG?

Deep canvassing is talking to strangers – in person or over the phone – about hopes, fears and aspirations. We reach across differences to build connections and trust through conversation.

Over the past 12 years, deep canvassers have changed hearts and minds around race, immigration, healthcare, marriage equality and more.

In 2020, People’s Action and the New Conversation Initiative partnered to deep canvass in swing states to win the White House and flip the Senate in Georgia. 

Building on this success, we now offer training and volunteer opportunities to help create lasting, transformational change in the United States. 

  These conversations are grounded in radical empathy, being curious about what people are up against, and how they’re making meaning in the world. 

HOW does it work?

In 2020, People’s Action and the New Conversation Initiative trained 37,000 volunteers, who held more than 290,000 phone conversations in swing states and Georgia. We moved voters by more than 48 percent. In November, our impact was larger than the 2016 margin of victory, and equal to 108 electoral votes. In Georgia, our persuasion rate was more than 58 percent.

Don’t take our word for it – an independent analysis of our work by political scientists Josh Kalla and David Broockman found our techniques more than 102 percent more effective than traditional persuasion.

    Deep canvassing: it is communicating with working-class people about our                   common humanity.  

WHAT DO YOU SAY?

Deep canvasses are candid, two-way conversations where you ask people to share their relevant, emotionally significant experiences and reflect on them aloud. These conversations typically involve:

  • Non-judgmentally soliciting views around an issue and asking follow-up questions to go deeper
  • Sharing narratives about personal experiences with the issue that reinforce values relevant to the issue.

In this excerpt from To See Each Other, a new People’s Action podcast hosted by George Goehl, Caitlin Homrich-Kneileng reflects on her first deep canvass conversation in Michigan.

  The reason deep canvassing is so effective because we’re taking the time
               to have meaningful human connection